Jonny publishes “Surveying the Temporal Structure of Sounds Used” in Music Perception

Jonny Vaisberg Journal of Music perception Lab alumni Jonny Vaisberg (’13) published an exhaustive “survey of sounds” exploring the temporal structures of auditory research published in the journal Music Perception. This paper builds on a previous bibliometric survey of topics by Anna Tirovolas and Dan Levitin, and shows that a great deal of work on auditory perception focuses on sounds with unnatural temporal structures.  We are interested in better understanding the types of sounds used in auditory research, given several lab projects demonstrating clear differences in the perceptual processing of tones with natural vs. artificial temporal structures.

 

“Moving to the beat” paper published in Psychonomic Bulletin & Review

pbr FionaFiona Manning and Dr. Schutz published ‘”Moving to the Beat” Improves Timing Perception’ in Psychonomic Bulletin & Review. This paper demonstrates that moving to the beat (tapping) while listening can objectively improve our perception of musical timing.  It forms the basis of subsequent explorations of differences in rhythm perception in percussionists and non-percussionists.  Click here to learn more about this project.

Jess Gillard Publishes a technical brief in the Journal of Medical Devices

Jess 2013 Jessica Gillard authored a technical brief titled ‘Exploring Melodic Structure to Increase Heterogeneity of Auditory Alarm Sets in Medical Devices’,  published in the Journal of Medical Devices. This paper explores the melodic structure of auditory alarms used in hospitals and offers new, detailed information on alarm confusions that can help inform future research on melodic alarm design.  The design of auditory alarms in medical devices is a new area of study for the lab, but one with significant potential for improving the delivery of health care services.

Fiona Manning receives the Queen Elizabeth Graduate Scholarship in Science and Technology

FionaFiona Manning received $15,000 from the Queen Elizabeth Graduate Scholarship in Science and Technology for the 2012-2013 academic year. This scholarship is awarded annually to a student who exhibits overall academic excellence, research ability, excellent communication skills and interpersonal and leadership abilities. Congratulations Fiona! QE

 

Rhythm and emotional piano projects featured at ICMPC and ESCOM!

Thessaloniki, Greece

Fiona Manning and Matthew Poon were invited to present posters at the 12th International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition (ICMPC) and 8th Triennial Conference of the European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music (ESCOM) 2012 in Thessaloniki, Greece, July 23-28, 2012.  Their posters were titled:
  • Using body movement as a surrogate for timing throughout silence (Manning) which highlights differences in timing abilites when tapping vs. not tapping during silent beats.
  • Exploring changes in the use of acoustic cues for emotion between the Classical and Romantic eras (Poon) which demonstrates differences in the way composers used pitch height and articulation rate to communicate emotion between eras.

Matthew Poon is awarded a second Undergraduate Student Research Award

NSERC  Piano major and MAPLE Lab student Matthew Poon received an Undergraduate Student Research Award from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) to cover sixteen weeks of full-time research in the summer of 2012 ($5,625). He used this award to continue his research on the differences in pitch height, dynamics and articulation rate of major and minor pre-composed musical pieces from across different time periods.  For more information about this project see here.

 

Matthew Poon wins NSERC USRA funding for music cognition research

Matthew Poon

Undergraduate student Matthew Poon received an Undergraduate Student Research Award from the faculty of Humanities to cover fifteen weeks of full-time research in the summer of 2011 ($6,000). He will use this award to continue his research on the differences in pitch height and articulation rate of major and minor precomposed musical pieces.  Click here for more information on this project.